SVE NEWS & CNN Sharing Series – Boris Johnson’s bid for early election fails

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46 min ago

Prorogation ceremony stalled by protest

An extraordinary scene has broken out in the middle of a traditionally polite prorogation ceremony.

Black Rod, the traditional gatekeeper of the House of Lords, walked into the House of Commons to request the presence of MPs in the upper chamber for the pomp — as is tradition.

But a group of opposition lawmakers held up sheets of paper with “Silenced” written on them, and outgoing Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow was not in the mood to entertain the traditional theatricality of the event.

In a remarkable show of dissent, Bercow sat slumped in his chair and made his anger with Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament clear.

He said he would “play (his) part” in the ceremony, before adding, “this is not, however, a normal prorogation. It is not typical, it is not standard, it is one of the longest for decades”

Eventually he reluctantly rose, and was joined with Conservative MPs to make the walk to the House of Lords. Chants of “Shame on you!” reigned down in the chamber from MPs as the ceremony got back underway.

1 hr 7 min ago

What’s going on?

It’s just gone 1 a.m. in London, and a mammoth day in Parliament is coming to an end.

MPs and Lords are putting on their wigs and gowns to get ready for the prorogation ceremony, and no, that isn’t a joke.

The ceremony will officially bring to an end a historically long session of Parliament, which has seen two prime ministers and years of debate over Brexit.

1 hr 26 min ago

Johnson attacks opposition parties for blocking early election

 

Watch Boris Johnson’s response after he lost an attempt to secure a snap general election for the second time in a matter of days.

1 hr 32 min ago

At least Johnson’s been consistent, jokes SNP leader

In a brief response to the vote rejecting Boris Johnson’s call for a snap election, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: “I hope the Prime Minster will reflect on the issue of prorogation, and shutting down Parliament to avoid a government being held to account, because that is exactly what he has done today and proposes to do to this country” Jeremy Corbyn says in his response to the vote.”

“At least he’s been consistent,” SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford adds of Johnson. “He’s lost every vote he’s brought to this House since he became Prime Minister.”

“Perhaps that’s the reason that he’s tried to shut down democracy this evening,” Blackford added.

1 hr 35 min ago

The opposition think they know better than the people, Boris Johnson says after losing election bid

“I earlier urged the House to trust the people but once again the opposition think they know better,” Boris Johnson said after losing his early election appeal a second time.

“They want to delay Brexit yet again … not only have they refused to choose the way ahead, they have now twice denied the British people their say in an election.”

“Now the House will be suspended until mid-October,” he said and added that he hoped the opposition uses that time “to reflect.”

“No matter how many devices this Parliament invents to tie my hands, I will strive to get an agreement in the national interest … this government will not delay Brexit any further,” he said.

“They cannot hide forever,” Johnson told Corbyn. “The moment will come when the people will finally get their chance to deliver their verdict.”

1 hr 39 min ago

BREAKING: Boris Johnson’s bid for an early election fails

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has lost a second attempt in the House of Commons to force an early general election. The motion, which needed a majority of two thirds to pass, fell far short of that threshold.

Only 293 MPs voted for the motion, with 46 against. Johnson needed the support of two-thirds of MPs (at least 434) to trigger an early election.

1 hr 13 min ago

HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers voting on Johnson’s election request

After a lengthy debate, MPs are now filing into the voting lobbies to have their say on Boris Johnson’s motion.

He’s asking to be granted an early general election — but a united front from opposition parties is set to hand him another parliamentary defeat.

Voting will take about 15 minutes.

1 hr 24 min ago

This is not a student debating society, Jo Swinson tells Boris Johnson

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s motion for an early general election is getting a predictably frosty reception from opposition lawmakers during the House of Commons debate.

“Any general election must be undertaken in a period of calm, with an orderly approach, not in a period of national crisis,” Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson said.

“The Prime Minster is playing at this. In his speech tonight, he made it sound like this was sport, like this was a game. This is not a student debating society. This is about the national interest,” she added.

Earlier, the SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford told Johnson “we’ve had enough of this dictatorship,” and warned him “his days in office are numbered.”

1 hr 41 min ago

Newspaper front pages tell story of a divided nation

The vote on Boris Johnson’s snap election motion has yet to take place, but as anyone who’s ever worked on a newspaper knows, deadlines are deadlines.

Tomorrow’s front pages tell the story of a divided nation.

The Conservative-supporting Daily Telegraph, of which Johnson was recently the highest-paid columnist, has focussed on Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow’s decision to stand down on the same day Brexit is delivered. The paper has been a long-term critic of the Speaker for what it sees as his anti-Brexit bias.

The Daily Mail goes a step further, with one of its highest-profile columnists calling Bercow a “partisan pipsqueak who disgraced his office.”

However, the Financial Times takes a more nuanced view, saying that the Speaker has stood up for the House of Commons and given it teeth during difficult times. This is the view of many remain-supporting lawmakers.

Back to the politics, and the left-leaning Guardian gives its lead story to Johnson’s defeat in the Commons, which will force his senior aides to hand over private communication on the government’s decision to suspend Parliament.

Leading left-wing tabloid, the Daily Mirror, calls Johnson “Britain’s worst prime minister,” and goads him for his numerous losses.

And finally, The Times reflects on a marathon sitting in Parliament, reflecting on the fact the the longest sitting of Parliament yet resulted in yet another humiliation for the new Prime Minister.

 

1 hr 55 min ago

HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers voting on Johnson’s election request

After a lengthy debate, MPs are now filing into the voting lobbies to have their say on Boris Johnson’s motion.

He’s asking to be granted an early general election — but a united front from opposition parties is set to hand him another parliamentary defeat.

Voting will take about 15 minutes.

2 hr 6 min ago

This is not a student debating society, Jo Swinson tells Boris Johnson

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s motion for an early general election is getting a predictably frosty reception from opposition lawmakers during the House of Commons debate.

“Any general election must be undertaken in a period of calm, with an orderly approach, not in a period of national crisis,” Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson said.

“The Prime Minster is playing at this. In his speech tonight, he made it sound like this was sport, like this was a game. This is not a student debating society. This is about the national interest,” she added.

Earlier, the SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford told Johnson “we’ve had enough of this dictatorship,” and warned him “his days in office are numbered.”

2 hr 23 min ago

Newspaper front pages tell story of a divided nation

The vote on Boris Johnson’s snap election motion has yet to take place, but as anyone who’s ever worked on a newspaper knows, deadlines are deadlines.

Tomorrow’s front pages tell the story of a divided nation.

The Conservative-supporting Daily Telegraph, of which Johnson was recently the highest-paid columnist, has focussed on Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow’s decision to stand down on the same day Brexit is delivered. The paper has been a long-term critic of the Speaker for what it sees as his anti-Brexit bias.

The Daily Mail goes a step further, with one of its highest-profile columnists calling Bercow a “partisan pipsqueak who disgraced his office.”

However, the Financial Times takes a more nuanced view, saying that the Speaker has stood up for the House of Commons and given it teeth during difficult times. This is the view of many remain-supporting lawmakers.

Back to the politics, and the left-leaning Guardian gives its lead story to Johnson’s defeat in the Commons, which will force his senior aides to hand over private communication on the government’s decision to suspend Parliament.

Leading left-wing tabloid, the Daily Mirror, calls Johnson “Britain’s worst prime minister,” and goads him for his numerous losses.

And finally, The Times reflects on a marathon sitting in Parliament, reflecting on the fact the the longest sitting of Parliament yet resulted in yet another humiliation for the new Prime Minister.

2 hr 31 min ago

Boris Johnson is running away from scrutiny, Jeremy Corbyn says

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the “only conclusion” that can be reached on Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy “is that the government’s pretensions to negotiate are nothing but a sham.”

“The Prime Minister knows full well there is no mandate for no-deal, no majority support for it in the country, and no majority support for it in this House,” he said, speaking during a debate in the House of Commons about calling an early election.

“This is a very serious issue — the Prime Minister is running away from scrutiny with his blather and his shouting,” he said to laughs from the government benches.

Corbyn quoted Michael Gove in March of this year saying the British people didn’t vote to leave with no deal, and notes Gove is now in charge of no-deal Brexit planning.

“I want to turf out this reckless government,” Corbyn said. But added: “A general election isn’t something for the Prime Minster to play about with for propaganda points, or even his very poor quality posts on social media.”

2 hr 44 min ago

No election until no-deal Brexit is off the table, says Jeremy Corbyn

 

In his response to Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s speech calling for an early election, Jeremy Corbyn said his Labour Party want an election — but not if it involves risking a no-deal Brexit.

“The only point of any importance that the Prime Minister has just included in his speech is his clear indication that he does not intend to follow the law that has just been passed that requires him to ask for an extension in certain circumstances,” Corbyn said.

“No deal has been taken off the table.”

“I want an election, as the Prime Minster pointed out … I don’t retreat from that at all. We are eager for an election,” he added.

“But as keen as we are, we are not prepared to risk inflicting the disaster of no deal on our communities our jobs, our services, or indeed our rights.”

“No deal would not be a clean break. It would not mean just getting on with it. It would start a whole new period of confusion and delay.”

2 hr 52 min ago

I will not ask for another delay, Boris Johnson says

“The leader of the opposition cannot lead, he cannot make a decision. He cannot work out whether he is for Brexit or against it,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the House of Commons during a debate on holding an early general election.

“Perhaps their next policy will be whether to have a referendum on whether to have a referendum.”

“If you really want to delay Brexit beyond October 31… then vote for an election and let the people decide if they want a delay or not,” he said to Corbyn.

“If you refuse to do that tonight I will go to Brussels on October 17 and negotiate our party … hopefully with a deal, but without one if necessary,” he said.

“I will not ask for another delay,” he insisted, again signalling his desire to ignore the law that he must ask for an extension if he cannot achieve a deal.

2 hr 59 min ago

Johnson fixes his mic as he addresses MPs

 

“We know the real reason why Labour don’t want a general election” under Corbyn’s leadership, Boris Johnson tells the House of Commons. “Most of the don’t want a general election because they fear that their party will lose.”

Then, in a jibe at internal divisions within Corbyn’s party over his leadership, he adds: “But there is small, terrified minority of Labour MPs who don’t want an election because they actually think he might win.”

“The common thread joining all these parties is their extraordinary belief that the national interest requires them preemptively to protect the British people from the consequences of their own democratic decisions,” Johnson says.

“They only believe in democracy when it delivers the response that they want.”

Then, when Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow interjects to ask lawmakers to keep it down, Johnson responds with a bit of trademark theatricality, lifting up the microphone behind the dispatch box to cheers from his backbenchers.

3 hr 2 min ago

Meanwhile in Brussels

MPs in Westminster may be debating into the early hours, but Brussels isn’t losing any sleep over Brexit.

Tuesday is a big day for the European Union as its executive arm, the European Commission, is set to announce its new line up of commissioners.

The make up of the body – the EU’s de-facto cabinet – will say a lot about Europe’s post-Brexit landscape. The new commissioners will take up their roles on November 1st, a day after the UK is set to leave the bloc. The UK has not fielded a candidate.

This, as Downing St continues to pursue a policy of dialogue but disengagement with Europe.

Among EU circles, there is a sense Boris Johnson is running down the clock until the very last moment.

And an extension – whether he is willing to follow parliament’s instruction and ask for one – isn’t guaranteed either, with France’s foreign minister suggesting his country could play hard ball at the EU Council Summit on October 17.

3 hr 15 min ago

Labour fear I would win an election, Boris Johnson tells Parliament

Opening the debate on an early election, Prime Minister Boris Johnson called Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn “the first Leader of the Opposition in the history of our country to show his confidence in her Majesty’s government, by declining the opportunity to have an election with a view to removing the government.”

He notes that Corbyn previously said he would back an election once the bill blocking a no-deal has achieved royal assent. “By his own logic, he must now back an election,” Johnson says.

“I have accepted the reality that an election is the only way to break the deadlock in the House.”

“Why are they conniving to delay Brexit, in defiance of the referendum?” Johnson asks of Labour. “The only possible explanation is that they fear that we will win it,” he says.

3 hr 21 min ago

HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers are debating Boris Johnson’s request for an election

We’ve made it — the main event of the night is beginning.

MPs are debating Boris Johnson’s second request for an early election. It will last for around 90 minutes, before a vote takes place. Johnson is not expected to come near the two-thirds majority needed to secure a snap election.

3 hr 34 min ago

Boris Johnson’s hands are tied, says Brexit Party MEP

 

Boris Johnson has “no choice” but to ask for a delay to Brexit, the Brexit Party MEP Alexandra Phillips has told CNN.

Phillips lamented the outrage from opposition benches to Johnson’s decision to prorogue Parliament, noting that the suspension amounts only to a handful of extra days that Parliament would otherwise have been sitting.

“What are they going to do in three days that they haven’t done in three years?,” she told CNN. “We’re talking actually a matter of days.”

And she said the bill blocking a no-deal Brexit has damaged the UK’s standing.

“Any country that says to a bloc, you must decide our future … that to me is absolutely bizarre. That doesn’t seem like representative democracy at all,” she said.

But Phillips accepted that Johnson’s hands are tied by the law.

“He has no choice … If it’s a choice between go to prison or have to do what is now the law of this law, then I suppose he has to do what is law of this land. Do I agree with it? Absolutely not.”

“But does Boris Johnson have a choice? No, I think Downing Street has been outsmarted by the Remain Alliance in Parliament on this,” Phillips said.

3 hr 52 min ago

Why is Parliament not talking about Brexit right now

Given the urgency of Brexit – particularly acute now that Prime Minister Boris Johnson has opted so suspend Parliament at the end of today – you’d be forgiven for asking why the House of Commons is currently engaged in a lengthy debate about Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland, the smallest country that makes up the United Kingdom, has not had a sitting parliament since 2017. The history of Northern Ireland requires that power is shared between unionists, whose loyalty lies with the United Kingdom, and republicans, who historically identified as wishing to be part of the Republic of Ireland.

That power-sharing agreement collapsed in early 2017 over a scandal thought to have cost the taxpayer millions.

Stormont in Belfast.
Stormont in Belfast. PAUL FAITH/AFP/Getty Images

In theory, the debate taking place in Parliament now is part of what is supposed to be a fortnightly update on the formation of a power-sharing executive in Northern Ireland. However, the reason these debates are beholden on the government was part of a move by anti-no-deal MPs to block a no-deal. It’s quite complicated, but also quite important.

After Northern Ireland has been discussed, MPs will move onto debating the ongoing restoration works of the Houses of Parliament. The gothic palace has been crumbling for some time and the restoration works are ongoing. However, in order to keep those works ticking over, legislation needs to be passed.

Why is this all happening today?

Parliament only returned from its summer recess last week and has since then had the risk of prorogation hanging over it. So while Brexit is front and center, all this other business must be taken care of.

Isn’t democracy fun.

4 hr 27 min ago

Get ready for Parliament’s closing ceremony

Black Rod (center, right) carrying his black rod.
Black Rod (center, right) carrying his black rod. ALASTAIR GRANT/AFP/Getty Images

Fast forward a few hours. It’s approaching midnight (or maybe even later), everyone is tired of talking about Brexit, and Parliament is about to be closed for business for five weeks.

But, since this is the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland we’re talking about, they’re not just going to lock up shop and head to bed.

Oh no. Instead, we get the time-honored Prorogation Ceremony. Yes, there is a ceremony.

What does it involve, you definitely didn’t ask? Well, the ceremony begins with an announcement read on behalf of the Queen.

Her statement, read by the Leader of the House of Lords in that chamber, says: “My Lords, it not being convenient for Her Majesty personally to be present here this day, she has been pleased to cause a Commission under the Great Seal to be prepared for proroguing this present Parliament.”

Then Black Rod gets involved. Black Rod is not actually a black rod, but a person referred to as Black Rod who carries a black rod. Black Rod has been around since the 14th century, and the current Black Rod — whose real-life name is Sarah Clarke — has been in the post since 2018.

The current Black Rod, Sarah Clarke.
The current Black Rod, Sarah Clarke.

Anyway, as I was saying, Black Rod carries a black rod at the opening and closing of Parliament, to help fulfil her or his duty to maintain the House of Lords.

At tonight’s ceremony, Black Rod will summon the House of Commons to the House of Lords. When the Commons arrive, representatives from each house greet each other — the Lords by doffing their hat, which is British for “hello,” and the Commons by bowing.

Then the government gets to read out their achievements from the past year, and then there is some speaking in Norman French.

Once that’s completed, Parliament is officially prorogued. But it’s not over. Lawmakers must then file out of the chamber, shaking hands with the Speaker as they go.

At this point, in accordance with tradition, the Spice Girls perform a medley of their hits.

Wait, no, that was the Olympics closing ceremony. Ah yes — at this point everyone goes to party conference for a month to argue some more about Brexit.

Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
5 hr 8 min ago

The no-deal debate is over

The debate over the rule of law has wrapped up with a vote. The ayes had it, so there was no need for MPs to go through the voting lobbies — saving us all 15 minutes of our lives.

To clarify, the vote doesn’t really mean anything — the motion was mainly tabled to give opposition lawmakers the chance to go on the record with their displeasure about the prospect of Johnson ignoring the law blocking no-deal.

MPs are now moving onto a debate about Northern Ireland, after which Johnson will make his second push for an election.

5 hr 14 min ago

Johnson will not go to Brussels to negotiate a delay, Raab says

Representing the government, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Boris Johnson is still attempting to achieve a deal with the European Union.

“This prime minister, this government, wants a deal,” Raab said. “And I believe it would be much better than no-deal.”

But he added that “respecting the referendum must also mean that this House allows us to leave without a deal.”

“Three years in experience to date demonstrates that taking that option off the table severely weakened our negotiating position in Brussels.”

“Much much worse than no-deal would be to destroy the confidence in the most basic democratic principle we have,” Raab added “The country wants this mess sorted out by the 31st of October.”

“He will not go to negotiate a delay … he will go to negotiate our departure” on October 31, Raab said, referring to Johnson.

5 hr 24 min ago

Boris Johnson “must resign” if he defies parliament, SNP leader tells Prime Minister

Charles McQuillan/Getty Images
Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

The SNP’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford has said Boris Johnson must resign if he is serious about defying a law blocking a no-deal Brexit next month.

“The Prime Minister says he would rather die in a ditch than write to seek an extension to protect our economy from falling off the cliff edge,” Blackford said during the Commons debate. Johnson used the phrase during a speech last week.

“If that is the course that he chooses, then the Prime Minister must resign. Undermining democracy at every turn, the Prime Minister simply cannot be trusted.

“The rule book has been well and truly ripped up. And with it, democracy and decency. Shredded by a cult of Brexit fanboys in Number 10. Unfit to govern, unwilling to govern. What a despicable state of affairs,” Blackford said, adding: “I say to the Prime Minister be very careful. Be very careful. Do not obstruct the rule of law.”

6 hr 34 min ago

HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers debate whether Boris Johnson will uphold no-deal law

After forcing the government to publish its documents on no-deal, opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn is now starting a debate on the rule of law, and whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson will abide by the bill blocking a no-deal Brexit that achieved royal assent earlier on Monday.

The debate will last 90 minutes.

“Parliament has passed a law to ensure that the will of parliament is upheld,” Corbyn said, opening the debate.

He added “the fact that Parliament is compelled” to do so “shows what extraordinary times we live in.”

And the Labour leader noted that Johnson is not present in the House of Commons to respond to points raised in the debate. “I do not keep the Prime Minister’s diary, he may keep his own, but here’s certainly not here to reply to this debate,” Corbyn said.

6 hr 41 min ago

BREAKING: MPs approve publication of government documents

Lawmakers have approved the motion that called on Downing Street to publish its communications about proroguing government, and its documents about the impact of a no-deal Brexit.

The vote passed by 311 votes to 302.

6 hr 59 min ago

HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers voting on publishing documents

Lawmakers are voting on whether to force the government to publish documents relating to its no-deal Brexit planning and its decision to prorogue Parliament.

If the motion passes, a whole swathe of communications between Downing Street advisers could be released.

The vote will take about 15 minutes and a result will be announced immediately afterwards.

7 hr 25 min ago

Trust between Parliament and Downing Street is “eroding day by day,” says Starmer

Keir Starmer, Labour’s Shadow Brexit Secretary, has said the government should have the “decency and courage” to publish its communications about proroguing Parliament and a no-deal Brexit.

“The basic lack of trust that exists between the House and the executive is eroding day by day and it is extraordinary to shut down Parliament at this time,” he said during the debate.

“It is blindingly obvious why we are being shut down, to prevent scrutiny, as there can be no scrutiny if we are not sitting,” Starmer added.

He was pressed over Labour’s refusal to grant Boris Johnson an election, despite the party repeatedly stating for two years that they want a vote.

“I’m sure we’ll have a general election soon, but not at the cost of a no-deal Brexit,” Starmer said.

7 hr 48 min ago

Deputy Speaker says he’ll run to replace Bercow

Boris Johnson doesn’t look like he’ll get his election… but those with their eye on John Bercow’s position will.

Lindsay Hoyle, the current deputy Speaker, has confirmed he’ll throw his hat into the ring to replace Bercow when he steps aside.

The election will be closely watched, with those in the government eager to avoid another holder willing to intervene in the Brexit saga as readily as Bercow.

8 hr 10 min ago

What’s happening in Parliament tonight?

We could be in for a long night.

For the next hour or so, MPs will continue debating the motion asking the government to publish its no-deal planning documents and correspondence over the suspension of parliament. There’ll be a vote at the end of the debate, which will take around 15 minutes.

Then, around 7.30 p.m. (2.30 p.m. ET) the same will follow — a 90 minute debate, and possibly a 15 minute vote afterwards — for the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn’s urgent question, over the rule of law and whether Johnson will abide by the law blocking no deal.

After that there’ll be about an hour of debate over other matters, followed after 10 p.m. (5 p.m. ET) by the evening’s headline act: a debate and vote on Johnson’s request for an early election.

So, in short, we have about five hours of debates and votes ahead of us. Make sure you savor every minute, though: at the end of the night, Parliament will be prorogued until mid-October and we’ll all have to find something else to do with our time.

8 hr 39 min ago

MPs debating motion for government to publish correspondence

Lawmakers in the House of Commons are debating the urgent question granted by Speaker John Bercow earlier, asking the government to publish its correspondence about proroguing Parliament and its “Operation Yellowhammer” documents about no-deal planning.

They will debate until after 7 p.m. local time (2 p.m. ET), after which there will be a vote on whether to approve the motion.

If it passes, the motion could throw up some juicy details of the planning amongst Boris Johnson’s government for the suspension of Parliament. It asks for “Ministers to lay before this House, not later than 11.00pm Wednesday 11 September, all correspondence and other communications (whether formal or informal, in both written and electronic form, including but not limited to messaging services including WhatsApp, Telegram, Signal, Facebook messenger, private email accounts both encrypted and unencrypted, text messaging and iMessage and the use of both official and personal mobile phones) to, from or within the present administration, since 23 July 2019 relating to the prorogation of Parliament”.

8 hr 55 min ago

Bercow agrees to debate on whether Johnson will obey the law blocking no-deal

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has now asked for an urgent parliamentary question, on whether the Prime Minister will obey the law blocking a no-deal Brexit that achieved royal assent earlier on Monday.

“There is very deep concern, not just across this House but across the whole country, at the commitment of the government to abide by the obligations set out in that act and the outright statements in some quarters that they will disregard or seek to evade the law,” Corbyn said.

As expected, Speaker of the House John Bercow accepted the request. It will be debated later, for up to 90 minutes.

By Bianca Britton and Rob Picheta, CNN

Updated 8:30 p.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Sources from: CNN

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One thought on “SVE NEWS & CNN Sharing Series – Boris Johnson’s bid for early election fails”

  1. Like!! I blog frequently and I really thank you for your content. The article has truly peaked my interest.

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